Main Threads:Would Someone Confirm My Plan Will Work?
  • Hello,

    I'm new to using this software and to imaging harddrives. Please tell me if what I'm planning to do below is likely to work and what I need to be aware of.


    We have four computers, all running on Windows 10.


    I bought a 4 TB external harddrive to be used exclusively to store image files of all four computers, to be used if any one of the computer's hard drives should fail, in which case I would purchase a new harddrive of equal or larger size, install it in the computer, and restore that computer's image onto the new harddrive.


    The harddrive info on the four computers is:


                            Capacity      Used            Remaining

    Computer 1:    1,810 GB     441 GB 1,380 GB

    Computer 2:    1,810 GB     247 GB 1,560 GB

    Computer 3:    568 GB     238 GB 330 GB 

    Computer 4:    911 GB     177 GB 733 GB

    _________________________________________

    Totals:             5,099 GB     1,103 GB     4,003 GB


    None of the computers is partitioned. All have only C: drives.


    Based on what I've read so far, my plan is to use Disk Backup to create each image file. As I say above, I plan to store them all on a single external harddrive dedicated to this purpose alone.


    Does my plan appear to be workable? What pitfalls, if any, do I need to be aware of?


    Thanks,
    Bill

  • Seems ok. Don't run back ups at the same time. You probably only want the new external drive writing one back up at a time. If you only have a C drive without additional partitions, you could use either system or disk image.

    How will the new external be connected to your network? I'm assuming you are using a home network. If not you will have to do each back up manually as you connect the drive to each. If hooked into a network, you'll need its IP address to set up your schedule and have it as your backup destination. All can be saved on one drive. Just give each back up a unique name.

  • Thanks, Flyer. 


    Not a network. I'll be hooking the external HD up to one computer at a time to make the image. I want the images so that if a comptuer's HD fails, I won't have to install the programs one at a time. Separate from the images, which I'll update if programs are added or deleted, I'll be using another program to regularly back up the data files.

    I realize that if I do have to use an image, I will then have to replace the out-of-date data files with the more up-to-date ones.

    Am I correct, then, that other than a replacement HD needing to be large enough for the image that's being installed on it, there are no other considerations as to the type of HD, etc.?


    Bill

  • You can also use Aomei incremental (disk) backups instead of another program to regularly backup. That way you also build up a file history so you can go back to previous versions of the data files. But that takes more space on the external drive than just a file copy of the last version. Which can be done with Aomei too (File Sync).


  • You have a lot of options with what you want to accomplish.

    I'd create 4 folders on the external drive, one for each PC. Say PC1, PC2, etc or use a name for each. If you have AOMEI on each PC, then one at a time, plug in the external HD (probably should be a USB type) and create a disk (or system) full backup of the C drive and browse to the external drive and folder that matches that PC as the backup destination. Name the backup but no need to set a schedule. Run the backup. Repeat for each PC. 

    Since you're doing this manually, you might want to repeat this process maybe once a week or month. You've already created a backup set so no need to repeat this process. You just have to plug in the external HD and run it. After you create a new full image, you could then just delete the older image. This way you will have a fairly current image of each PC to restore if necessary and not need a huge drive for storage.

    A 2TB external USB HD should be sufficient. Seagate and WD both have these.


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